Bookmuse gives RETALIO its seal of approval.

The esteemed Bookmuse site has reviewed RETALIO and I was so moved by it I almost cried. Their reviewer understands RETALIO and the Roma Nova books in her gut as well as her heart.

“A read so painfully pertinent you could almost wish it were true. If you haven’t come across this alternative history […]

The Aurelia/Caius grudge match

“Dramatis personae” – you may have seen this at the top of the cast list in those plays you read at school. “Personae” is Latin for people and “dramatis” means of the drama or play. For the Roma Nova novels, it seems entirely appropriate in a world of people who are definitely dramatic!

So who are the […]

RETALIO - the book trailer is here!

 

 

https://youtu.be/Mql2Mm3ytJc

Yes, the book trailer (with the exciting music) is now on YouTube.

Enjoy!

 

Alison Morton is the author of Roma Nova thrillers INCEPTIO, PERFIDITAS, SUCCESSIO, AURELIA and INSURRECTIO. The sixth, RETALIO, will be published on 27 April 2017. Audiobooks now available for the first four of the series

Get INCEPTIO, the series starter, […]

A very peculiar feeling – spooked and thrilled

A week before Christmas, something very strange happened to my first book. The main character, Karen, stepped out from the covers and started talking. I mean, really talking, and in a young American voice (Caitlin Thorburn).

I listened and a tingle ran across my shoulders. I was spooked. There’s no other way to describe it. But […]

History? Um, we know the ending...

All writers sneak a look at their reviews – we are that human. Looking at INSURRECTIO’s, I was struck by this one: “Although I enjoyed the first three, IV and V are disappointing; particularly this one. Because they are ‘backstory’, I already knew who did what to whom from the earlier novels.”

I appreciate them taking the […]

Carina, Aurelia and the Pompeii gladius

Twenty-first century Roma Nova military train with state of the art weaponry; their firepower and weapon handling are undoubted. But they also train on a ‘volunteer’ basis with a modern carbon steel version of the traditional Pompeii gladius, a short sword in use from at least AD 79 and not uncommon in the 4th century AD.

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